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 Post subject: MANUAL CAMERA SETTING
PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:31 pm 

Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:28 pm
Posts: 3
sometimes my 3d plane to calibrate two kinects are a bit off, for a some unknown reasons to me, my questions is, is there any way to manually move a camara for a little twitching or will it be implementedin new releases? Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:29 am 
iPi Soft

Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:12 am
Posts: 2038
Location: Moscow, Russia
You can adjust camera position at the Scene tab. However, it is not recommended to do after calibration, because you will never have more accurate results with manual positioning than with automatic.
You'd better concentrate on improving you calibration procedure. Do you give the calibration board enough movement within the capture area - back and forth, side to side? Is it properly recognized in the view of both sensors most of the time? How many good frames are reported after the calibration process is complete? It should be at least 100-200.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:42 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:28 pm
Posts: 3
normally i give it 180-200 frames to calibrate, but now this didn't know, should i move the calibration plane during this frame? i tough it was supposed to be still...


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 1:02 am 
iPi Soft

Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:12 am
Posts: 2038
Location: Moscow, Russia
Strider wrote:
i tough it was supposed to be still...

Absolutely not. You should move it at least in a half-meter range for good calibration results. Also make it tilt and yaw slightly, holding its sides parallel to the floor. And ensure its corners are not in touch with your body - hold by the middle of a side, not a corner, in a straight arm.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 1:08 am 

Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 1:34 pm
Posts: 2290
Location: Los Angeles
More motion is better--holding the board absolutely still does not give the tracker enough useful information to reconstruct the camera positions. And especially include back to front motions--this tells the tracker which camera configuration you're using. Move the board smoothly though--jerky motions may cause issues because Kinect is only 30fps and the recorded data is not necessary in sync to the exact frame all the time.

FYI, I typically record about 400 to 500 frames for calibration. Shorter sample (200 frames) is okay but more frames improves accuracy. That said, any more than 500 is probably overkill and unnecessary.

G.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 10:49 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:28 pm
Posts: 3
vmaslov wrote:
Strider wrote:
i tough it was supposed to be still...

Absolutely not. You should move it at least in a half-meter range for good calibration results. Also make it tilt and yaw slightly, holding its sides parallel to the floor. And ensure its corners are not in touch with your body - hold by the middle of a side, not a corner, in a straight arm.


Greenlaw wrote:
More motion is better--holding the board absolutely still does not give the tracker enough useful information to reconstruct the camera positions. And especially include back to front motions--this tells the tracker which camera configuration you're using. Move the board smoothly though--jerky motions may cause issues because Kinect is only 30fps and the recorded data is not necessary in sync to the exact frame all the time.

FYI, I typically record about 400 to 500 frames for calibration. Shorter sample (200 frames) is okay but more frames improves accuracy. That said, any more than 500 is probably overkill and unnecessary.

G.



Thanks! well, last sunday we recorded a lot of video... ashame, but it's only a fraction of the whole for a project, really appreciate the help! in the next sessions we'll do it right!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:24 pm 

Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 1:34 pm
Posts: 2290
Location: Los Angeles
Yes, it's a horrible feeling to lose an entire day of shooting because of poor calibration data. In the early days of iPi mocap, this happened to me often.

Thankfully, I learned from the experience though. If I'm recording a lot of motion, I will do a second calibration at the end of session, on the chance that a camera go bumped during the session. If it's a very long shoot, I may do some calibration videos during the shoot.

When running iPi Mocap Studio with dual Kinect on a desktop computer with a good graphics card, the entire calibration process only takes a couple of minutes, so I will run the calibration before shooting motion to be sure I have it.

If I'm using natural room lighting during daylight hours, I also like to run a new Background Evaluation from time to time. Natural lighting can change quickly, especially in the morning, which will affect background subtraction. Just something to keep in mind.

G.

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Greenlaw
Artist/Partner - Little Green Dog | Demo Reel (2017) | Demo Reel (2015) | Demo Reel (2013)

Image
Watch a one minute excerpt on Vimeo now!


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